Technology in Motion

Welcome to the Technology In Motion (TIM) project page, hosted by the Leiden University Medical Center.

Our mission is to develop and apply innovative ICT techniques for the evaluation and treatment of motor disorders. We will develop techniques that are relevant for clinical application, efficient, unobtrusive, easy to use, patient-friendly, and cost-effective.

News

August 2019

An article about Project Holocue has been published in Parkinson Magazine. In Project Holocue the efficacy of a new medical device is examined to alleviate ‘freezing of gait’ in people with Parkinson’s disease.

Click on the image to read the article (in Dutch).

x

x

x

x

x

June 2019

From 30 June to 4 July, Melvyn Roerdink and Daphne Geerse were present at the “International Society of Posture and Gait Research” congress in Edinburgh (UK) to present their work on the Interactive Walkway and Holocue application. During a workshop “Mixed reality for posture and gait research: principles and applications”, the basic principles of mixed reality and its potential for posture and gait research were presented and a demonstration was given of the Holocue application, a mixed-reality application for on-demand cue activation to reduce freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease patients. In addition, through an oral presentation, the research results of the gait and balance study of the TIM project were presented by Daphne Geerse. The presented study investigated whether the Interactive Walkway can be used to identify future fallers and risk factors for future falls in a cohort of stroke patients, Parkinson’s disease patients and healthy individuals. Overall, we can look back at a very successful congress!

x

May 2019

On May 8, 2019, Daphne Geerse defended her thesis ‘A comprehensive approach to assess walking ability and fall risk using the Interactive Walkway’. The aim of the thesis was to determine if 1) the Interactive Walkway can validly assess walking ability and, if so, 2) whether the Interactive Walkway is useful for determining walking ability and fall risk in the clinic in stroke and Parkinson’s disease patients. A comprehensive assessment of the most important aspects of walking ability could help to better align treatment strategies with the individual needs of the patient. The Interactive Walkway turned out to be a promising and patient-friendly assessment of walking ability in the clinic. The Interactive Walkway consists of several Kinect v2 sensors to measure walking – without markers on the body – in 3D. In addition to measuring walking, the Interactive Walkway can also assess walking adaptability in a safe manner by (suddenly) presenting visual projections on the walkway like stepping stones or obstacles. This seems valuable because walking in daily life often needs to be adjusted, for example when crossing a street or avoiding crooked sidewalk tiles. Poor walking adaptability is also associated with a higher fall risk. However, this aspect of walking ability is usually not assessed in clinical tests. The Interactive Walkway now allows for a more comprehensive assessment of walking ability which also includes an assessment of walking adaptability.

Read the thesis here.

x

April 2019

On World Parkinson Day, the LUMC highlighted the research into Parkinson’s disease performed within the LUMC, which included the research of the ‘Technology in Motion’ movement lab. You can watch the video here.

x

March 2019

Linda van Schaik and Daphne Geerse gave a workshop at the Leiden International Medical Students’ Conference (LIMSC) on 15 March. About 30 students were given a tour of the ‘Technology in Motion’ movement lab, in which the opportunities of new technologies for evaluating motor functioning were explained.

x

February 2019

The paper ‘Walking adaptability for targeted fall-risk assessments’ written by Daphne Geerse, Melvyn Roerdink, Han Marinus and Bob van Hilten has been published in Gait and Posture. This study investigated whether the Interactive Walkway can be used to identify future fallers and risk factors for future falls in a cohort of stroke patients, Parkinson’s disease patients and healthy individuals. In addition to fall history, the percentage of successfully avoided obstacles and the normalized walking speed during goal-directed stepping were identified as predictive variables of falls, and the addition of these risk factors improved the identification of fallers. The identification of these risk factors could lead to more targeted and possibly also more effective fall prevention programs.

Click here to read the paper.

x

On February 6, the measurements of ‘Technology in Motion – Project Holocue: Towards on-demand and assist-as-needed patient-tailored cues to alleviate and prevent freezing or gait’ started. This research is funded by the Micheal J. Fox Foundation. Within this research, the efficacy of the HoloLens, a mixed-reality glasses, is examined for reducing freezing or gait in people with Parkinson’s disease. Four students of the Masters Human Movement Sciences will assist in carrying out the measurements.

x

December 2018

The paper “Assessing walking adaptability in Parkinson’s disease: ‘the Interactive Walkway’” written by Daphne Geerse, Melvyn Roerdink, Han Marinus and Bob van Hilten has been published in Frontiers in Neurology. The aim of the study was to evaluate the added value of Interactive Walkway assessments in Parkinson’s disease. The authors confirmed the added value of the assessments, which provide a comprehensive evaluation of walking ability. Future studies are warranted to examine the potential of the Interactive Walkway for the assessment of fall risk and informing on tailored falls prevention programs in people with Parkinson’s disease and in other populations with impaired walking ability.

Click here to read the paper.

x

November 2018

The Micheal J. Fox Foundation has honored the grant application from Melvyn Roerdink and Bob van Hilten. For two years, the efficacy of the Holocue-application will be investigated within the Holocue project. The Holocue-application was developed for the Microsoft HoloLens, an augmented reality glasses with which three-dimensional holograms can be projected in the real world. The Holocue-application is used to present cues, such as stripes on the ground, for people with Parkinson’s disease who suffer from freezing of gait, a temporary inability to generate effective stepping, in the hope of improving the treatment of this symptom.

 x

 x

October 2018

The paper “Cognitive-motor interference during goal-directed upper-limb movements” written by Linda Bank, Han Marinus, Rosanne van Tol, Iris Groeneveld, Paulien Goossens, Jurriaan de Groot, Bob van Hilten and Carel Meskers has been published in European Journal of Neuroscience. This paper focuses on assessing cognitive-motor interference (CMI) during upper-limb motor control. Dual-task effects were evaluated in in 57 healthy individuals and two highly prevalent neurological disorders associated with deficits of cognitive and motor processing (57 patients with Parkinson’s disease, 57 stroke patients). Performance was evaluated in cognitive and motor domains under single- and dual-task conditions. As expected, patients showed different patterns of CMI compared to controls, depending on diagnosis and severity of cognitive and/or motor symptoms. Healthy subjects experienced CMI especially under challenging conditions of the motor task. CMI was greater in PD patients, presumably due to insufficient attentional capacity in relation to increased cognitive involvement in motor control. No general increase of CMI was observed in stroke patients, but correlation analyses suggested that especially patients with severe motor dysfunction experienced CMI. Clinical ratings of cognitive and motor function were weakly associated with CMI, suggesting that CMI reflects a different construct than these unidimensional clinical tests. It remains to be investigated whether CMI is an indicator of difficulties with day-today activities.

Click here to read the paper.

The corresponding dataset can be accessed from the DANS-EASY repository (click here).

x

The paper Patient-tailored augmented reality games for assessing upper extremity motor impairments in Parkinson’s disease and stroke written by Linda Bank, Marina Cidota, Elma Ouwehand en Stephan Lukosch has been published in the Journal of Medical Systems. In this paper, we explored the opportunities of Augmented Reality (i.e., virtual objects placed into the real surrounding) combined with contactless tracking of the hand and upper body for objective quantification in motor (dys)function in a challenging, engaging and patient-tailored environment. In this study, we explore the potential of AR for evaluating 1) speed and goal-directedness of movements within the individually determined interaction space, 2) adaptation of hand opening to objects of different sizes, and 3) obstacle avoidance in 10 healthy individuals, 10 patients with Parkinson’s Disease and 10 stroke patients. As expected, PD patients moved slower than controls and needed more time for task completion. No differences were observed between stroke patients and controls, perhaps because motor impairments in this patient group were relatively mild. Importantly, usability of our AR system was good and considerably improved compared to our previous study due to more natural and patient-tailored interaction. Although our findings testify to the potential of AR for assessing motor impairments in patients with neurological conditions and provide starting points for further improvement, there are still many steps to be taken towards application in clinical practice.

Click here to read the paper.

The corresponding dataset can be accessed from the 4TU.ResearchData repository (click here).

x

September 2018

IMG_20180909_153706743 IMG_20180909_173726146

The paper “Hand-tremor frequency estimation in videos” written by Silvia Pintea, Jian Zheng, Xilin Li, Linda Bank, Bob van Hilten and Jan van Gemert received the “Best Paper Award” at the 4th Workshop on Observing and Understanding Hands in Action of the European Conference on Computer Vision 2018.

x

x

x

February 2018

IMG_1515Daphne Geerse was awarded the prize for ‘best presentation’ at the annual  Science Day of the Neurology Department at the LUMC. With her presentation about “Gait and gait adaptability in Parkinson’s Disease” she gave the audience a good insight into the potential value of assessing gait adaptability for predicting falls in patients with Parkinson’s Disease.

x

x

x

x

December 2017

2017-12-07-PHOTO-00000193

On Thursday December 7th, the Technology in Motion lab were present at the regional ParkinsonNet congress 2017 in Rotterdam. At the stand, visitors were informed about the research done in the Motion lab. Linda Bank and Daphne Geerse also presented their posters during a guided poster tour.

x

x

x

x

On the 7th and 8th of December, Marina Cidota and Stephan Lukosch will participate in a two-day workshop on “Virtual and Augmented Reality: Interaction and mental health applications” organized by the TU Delft. Click here for more information.

x

October 2017

The paper Validation of foot placement locations from ankle data of a Kinect v2 sensor written by Daphne Geerse, Bert Coolen, Detmar Kolijn and Melvyn Roerdink has been published in Sensors. The paper presents the research on the reliability of estimated step locations using the Kinect v2 sensor in a group of healthy participants.

Click here to read the paper.

x

Stephan Lukosch and Marina Cidota participated in the ISMAR’17 conference, in Nantes, France between 9-13 October 2017. At this international conference on Mixed and Augmented Reality, they presented 3 papers:

  1. Marina A. Cidota, Paulina J.M. Bank, P. (Elma) W. Ouwehand, Stephan G. Lukosch. Assessing Upper Extremity Motor Dysfunction Using an Augmented Reality Game.
  2. Jeffrey Goderie, Rustam Alashrafov, Pieter Jockin, Lu Liu, Xin Liu, Marina A. Cidota, Stephan G. Lukosch. ChiroChroma: An Augmented Reality Game for the Assessment of Hand Motor Functionality.
  3. Marina A. Cidota, Stephan G. Lukosch, Paulina J.M. Bank, P. (Elma) W. Ouwehand. Towards Engaging Upper Extremity Motor Dysfunction Assessment Using Augmented Reality Games.

x

On the 23rd of October, Marina Cidota participated in the first “innovation promenade” organized by the Franciscus Gasthuis hospital in Rotterdam. She gave a demo with the Augmented Reality system developed for hand/arm motor dysfunction assessment.

IMG_2648 IMG_0212 IMG_0082

x

September 2017

The paper “Optical hand tracking: a novel technique for the assessment of bradykinesia in Parkinson’s Disease” written by Linda Bank, Han Marinus, Carel Meskers, Jurriaan de Groot and Bob van Hilten has been published in Movement Disorders Clinical Practice. This paper describes how optical hand tracking (OHT) techniques can be used for patient-friendly, automated quantification of bradykinesia of the upper extremity in Parkinson’s Disease. Our findings showed that OHT can be used for quantification of movement components (such as velocity, amplitude, frequency, and interruptions of rhythm) of finger tapping and hand opening and closing. The paper also describes which kinematic parameters are most useful (i.e, show the largest difference between the PD and control groups and have good reliability) and which kinematic parameters were too susceptible to changes in movement strategy.

Click here to read the paper.

x

August 2017

The paper “Manipulation of visual information affects control strategy during a visuomotor tracking task” written by Linda Bank, Luuk Dobbe, Carel Meskers, Jurriaan de Groot and Erwin de Vlugt has been published in Behavioral Brain Research. This paper describes how performance, effort, motor control strategy and underlying neuromechanical parameters are affected by changes in the visual presentation of a visuomotor tracking task. Our findings indicate that effects of visual representation on motor behavior should be taken into consideration in designing, interpreting and comparing experiments on motor control in health and disease. In future studies, these insights might be exploited to assess the sensory-motor adaptability in various clinical conditions.

Click here to read the paper.

x

July 2017

Small motions are difficult to observe with the naked eye. Jan van Gemert presented an improved method for achieving this at the CVPR conference in Honolulu, Hawaii on Saturday, 22 July. The technique has potential for use in analysing tremors in Parkinson’s disease, for example. [Read more]

x

June 2017

WorkshopPresentatieFrom 25 to 29 June, Melvyn Roerdink and Daphne Geerse were present at the “International Society of Posture and Gait Research” congress in Fort Lauderdale (Florida, USA) to present their work on the Interactive Walkway. During a workshop “Movement-dependent event control: principles and applications”, a demonstration was given of the Interactive Walkway. In addition, through an oral and two poster presentations, the research results of the TIM project by Daphne Geerse were presented. Given the many enthusiastic responses and interest in the Interactive Walkway, we can look back at a very successful congress!

xx

x

The TIM project will be present at the TU Delft Research Exhibition from June 6th till June 8th. Stephan Lukosch and Marina Cidota will give demos with the Augmented Reality system that was designed for an assessment of patients with hand and/or arm motor dysfunctions.

x

May 2017

Tuesday May 16th, Daphne Geerse gave a presentation on “The Interactive Walkway for an evaluation of walking adaptability” at the NeuroControl Symposium.

x

April 2017

On Thursday April 20th, Linda Bank and Daphne Geerse gave a presentation on the Technology in Motion Lab at the Parkinson Café, a monthly meeting for Parkinson’s Disease patient and their caregivers at the nursing home Van Wijckerslooth in Oegstgeest. The new technologies used to evaluate movements in Parkinson’s Disease patients have been discussed. The attendees were enthusiastic and hope that the new technologies will be used in the near future in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease.

x

March 2017

The paper “Walking-adaptability assessments with the Interactive Walkway: Between-systems agreement and sensitivity to task and subject variations” written by Daphne Geerse, Bert Coolen and Melvyn Roerdink has been published in Gait & Posture. The paper presents the research on the reliability of the walking-adaptability outcome measures of the Interactive Walkway in a group of healthy subjects. From the results it was concluded that the walking-adaptability outcome measures were reliable. Therefore, Interactive Walkway walking-adaptability assessments are deemed usable for obtaining an objective and more task-specific examination of one’s ability to walk.

Click here to read the paper.

x

February 2017

All measurements of the research of PhD candidate Daphne Geerse on gait adaptability have been completed! Between April 2016 and February 2017 a total of 90 measurements have been performed in 30 people with Parkinson’s disease, 30 people who have had a stroke and 30 healthy people. The first results of the project will be presented at the “International Society of Posture and Gait Research” congress in Florida (Fort Lauderdale, June 25-29).

x

January 2017

medical-delta-research.originalAn article about the Technology in Motion lab has been published in the newsletter of Medical Delta, which is a network of life sciences, health and technology organizations in the region Leiden-Den Haag-Rotterdam-Delft.

Click here to read the article.

x

x

x

December 2016

The “gait and balance” study of the TIM project started in April 2016. Currently, 70 of the 90 planned participants completed the measurement at the LUMC. In addition, 22 participants also completed the 6-month follow-up period in which falls were registered on a falls calendar. In total, 111 “falls” and 99 “near-falls” were registered.

x

On Thursday December 8th, the Technology in Motion lab was present at the regional ParkinsonNet congress 2016 which was held in Rotterdam. At the stand, visitors were informed about the research done in the Motion lab. It was a nice and interactive day with many enthusiastic reactions.

TiM stand at the ParkinsonNET congress   20161208_134649

x

November 2016

Friday December 2nd, Melvyn Roerdink and Daphne Geerse will present their work at the SMALLL congress 2016: New methods of functional diagnostics. The SMALLL congress is a congress for people involved and interested in the area of clinical motion analysis in the Netherlands and Belgium. Melvyn Roerdink will give a presentation entitled: What is “good” walking and how do you measure it? Daphne Geerse will present her research on the Interactive Walkway.

Thursday December 8th, the regional ParkinsonNet congress 2016 will be held in Rotterdam. The Technology in Motion lab will be present with a stand to inform visitors about our research.

x

October 2016

artikel-lumens-10-2016

An article about the Technology in Motion lab has been published in LUMENS, the monthly magazine for all employees of the LUMC!

Click on the image to read the article.

Other publicity this month:

Friday October 7th, Linda Bank will give a presentation on “New technologies for evaluation of motor (dys)function” at the annual meeting of the Dystonia Society.

Saturday October 8th, Silvia Pintea will attend a workshop on “Brave new ideas for motion representations in videos”. At the workshop, which precedes the European Conference on Computer Vision, Silvia will present a new technique for motion detection in videos (“Making a case for learning motion representations with phase”, see http://bravenewmotion.github.io/)

Tuesday October 11th, Stephan Lukosch will give a presentation on “Motor function assessment using augmented reality games” (for the complete programme, click here). Technology for Health is the annual meeting point for professionals involved in the development phase of medical devices. Suppliers, developers, service providers and health professionals come together for an annual update, new projects and contacts.

Three excellent opportunities to present our work and new developments within the Technology in Motion project!

x

August 2016

On Wednesday July 20th the Interactive Walkway has been installed in the demonstration room of Motekforce Link (www.motekforcelink.com). Motekforce Link, producer of innovative rehabilitation technologies, will cooperate with the faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in marketing the Interactive Walkway. During the user training on Wednesday August 10th several employees of Motekforce Link have been introduced to the possibilities of the Interactive Walkway.

img_1361-2

x

July 2016

On July 1st, Silvia-Laura Pintea started as a postdoc on the TiM. She will work on automatic temporal analysis of (abnormal) movement.

x

This month, four ‘peer-reviewed’ papers have been accepted for publication:

  • “Depth-aware Motion Magnification”, in European Conference on Computer Vision 2016 (Julian F.P. Kooij and Jan C. van Gemert)
  • “SenseCap: Synchronized Data Collection with Microsoft Kinect2 and LeapMotion”, in ACM Multimedia 2016 (Julian F.P. Kooij)
  •  “Serious Gaming in Augmented Reality using HMDs for Assessment of Upper Extremity Motor Dysfunctions – User studies for Engagement and Usability”, in i-com: Journal of Interactive Media (http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/icom), Special Issue on Smartglass Technologies, Applications and Experiences. (Marina A. Cidota, Stephan G. Lukosch, Paul Dezentje, Paulina J.M. Bank, Heide K. Lukosch, Rory M.S. Clifford)
  • “A Haptic Serious Augmented Reality Game for Motor Assessment of Parkinson’s Disease Patients”, in ISMAR 2016 (Erik van derMeulen, Marina A. Cidota, Stephan G. Lukosch, Paulina J.M. Bank, Aadjan J.C. van der Helm, Valentijn T. Visch)

x

June 2016

IMG-20160630-WA0000 IMG-20160622-WA0002Daphne Geerse (left) and Linda Bank (right) presented their posters at the International Congress on Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders (Berlin, 19-23 June)

x

x

x

x

At the Technology for Health congress in Den Bosch, 11-12 October 2016, Stephan Lukosch will give a presentation on “Motor function assessment using augmented reality games” (for the complete programme, click here). Technology for Health is the annual meeting point for professionals involved in the development phase of medical devices. Suppliers, developers, service providers and health professionals come together for an annual update, new projects and contacts. An excellent opportunity to present our work and new developments within the Technology in Motion project!

x

May 2016

All measurements of the NEURAS project have been completed! Between March 2015 and May 2016, Linda Bank has performed a total of 225 measurements of arm and hand function in 57 people with Parkinson’s Disease, 57 people who have had a stroke, and 57 healthy people. The first results of the project will be presented at the Neurocontrol Symposium (Egmond aan Zee, 23-24 May) and the International Congress on Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders (Berlin, 19-23 June).

x

April 2016

On Thursday April 14th, a meeting was organized for physiotherapists, occupational therapists and speech IMAG1980therapists who are members of the ParkinsonNet. About 60 interested therapists from Leiden and surroundings attended the introductory presentation by Linda Bank, which was followed by an extensive tour of the Technology in Motion laboratory. Participants were treated to a demonstration of the Interactive Walkway, where they were able to experience various tests to evaluate gait adaptability. Also the assessment of hand and arm function (with the haptic robot and marker-less motion capture setup) was demonstrated. Given the many enthusiastic responses, it was a very successful evening!

x

x

March 2016

After a thorough preparation, PhD candidate Daphne Geerse has started with the measurements of her research on gait adaptability. A total of 90 subjects will participate in her study (30 people with Parkinson’s disease, 30 people who have had a stroke and 30 healthy people).

x

February 2016

Invited by the International Society of Posture and Gait Research, Melvyn Roerdink has written the blog “Moving toward a more task-specific and comprehensive evaluation of walking”. Read the blog here

x

Scientific partners

logo NWO logo-lumc tudelft VUlogo_NL_Wit_HR_RGB_tcm289-201376